Extradition Law: Hong Kong gears up for fresh protests



Hong Kong geared for more protests, including strikes, transport go-slows and even picnics, against a proposed extradition law that would allow people to be sent to China for trial, even as the city’s leader vowed on Tuesday to push ahead with the bill.

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam’s defiant pledge in the face of more mass protests underscored deep concerns across vast swaths of the Asian financial hub two days after hundreds of thousands took to the streets to protest against the bill.

In a rare move, prominent business leaders warned that pushing through the extradition law could undermine investor confidence in Hong Kong and erode its competitive advantages.

The extradition bill, which has generated unusually broad opposition at home and abroad and plunged the city into political crisis, is due for a second round of debate on Wednesday in the city’s 70-seat Legislative Council (LegCo). The legislature is controlled by a pro-Beijing majority.

Riot police ringed the LegCo building early on Monday and fought back a group of several hundred protesters after an otherwise peaceful march through the city’s financial district on Sunday.

Lam warned against any similar action.

“I call on schools, parents, institutions, corporations, unions to consider seriously if they advocate these radical actions,” Lam told a news briefing.

Human rights groups have repeatedly cited the alleged use of torture, arbitrary detentions, forced confessions and problems accessing lawyers in China as reasons why the bill should not proceed.

An online petition has called for 50,000 people to surround LegCo at 10 p.m. (1400 GMT) on Tuesday and remain until Wednesday, when the Chinese-ruled city is expected to see mass protests and more calls for the embattled Lam to step down.

Nearly 2,000 mostly small retail shops, including restaurants, grocery, book and coffee shops, have announced plans to strike, according to an online survey, a rare move in the staunchly capitalist economy.

Some tutorial schools, small hotels, law firms, social welfare workers and nearly 4,000 teachers also said they would go on strike and rally on Wednesday.

Prominent human rights lawyer Michael Vidler said he had notified all employees that his firm supported those who wanted to act according to their consciences on Wednesday.

Read More at :

   
 READ MORE NEWS
   
 ALSO LIKE READING